UNIX Network Programming: Networking APIs: Sockets and XTI; Volume 1

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Manufacturer Description

An introductory tutorial or class text and a reference for experienced programmers. Revised from the 1990 edition by using ANSI C for all examples, expanding and rearranging much of the material, dropping the explanation of UNIX, describing the Posix interface, some terminology change, and covering several new topics. It has also been divided into at least three volumes; the second probably on IPC: interprocess communications and the third on applications. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

The classic programming text Unix Network Programming has been updated by author W. Richard Stevens to encompass three new volumes. There have been a few changes in the computing world since 1990 (the year the original was published), and Stevens has taken the opportunity to create a complete set of reference manuals for programmers of all skill levels.

The first volume, Networking APIs: Sockets and XTI, covers everything you need to know to make your programs communicate over networks. Stevens covers everything from writing your programs to be compatible with both Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) and IPv6, to raw sockets, routing sockets, User Datagram Protocol (UDP), broadcasting/multicasting, routing sockets, server internals, and more, plus a section covering Posix threads.

Stevens also notes compatibility issues with different operating systems so that readers can create code that is more portable, and he offers plenty of advice on how to make code more robust. --Doug Beaver

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